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Workshop blitz speeds up transportation services at Fonterra plant

Fonterra

Executive Summary
Increased departmental workload highlighted issues in Fonterra’s Information Systems (IS) service delivery, with extended delays and errors in computer solution delivery resulting in high levels of customer dissatisfaction. A kaizen blitz conducted with personnel and suppliers over a five-day workshop identified two focus areas: initial order integrity and accuracy, and supply chain speed. Actions were formulated, prioritized and allocated to participants, including restructuring the online method for ordering and capturing correct information, and revising and enhancing stock management and reporting. Following the kaizen actions, backlog call volumes and age, as well as Mean Time to Completion (MTTC) dropped to an acceptable level and customer satisfaction improved considerably.

 

SituationWorkshop blitz speeds up transportation services at Fonterra plant - Results
The Fonterra IS department outsources many traditional functions, such as the helpdesk and the provision and installation of personal computers. Staffed by around 160 internal employees, the department coordinates the provision of about 200 desktop and laptop computers a month. Workload is determined by business growth, staff turnover or movement to new roles, capital project numbers and the current fleet’s age. A move within the organization to focus on speed to market has meant a surge of capital project approvals. This increase has coincided with the current fleet approaching replacement age, resulting in an increased departmental workload.

An uncomfortable number of customers were experiencing extended delays in computer solution delivery, often resulting in the matter being escalated to the IS department. This meant multiple employees were engaged in information gathering and fire fighting. Customer survey results showed declining satisfaction levels with the IS department’s IT solution delivery function.

A key principle was participation of all those involved so that they may improve and own the new processes.

The chain of events to deliver a correctly functioning PC to a Fonterra staff member involves many handovers, usually absent from an in-house process. Although using various suppliers/partners is beneficial in sourcing through “best of breed” and fostering a sense of commercial competition, MTTC had stretched to 19 working days. Compounding this situation was the large variation — completion could be as short as seven days and as long as 42 days. Analysis showed that if details in the initial order were incorrect or incomplete, completion time often extended well beyond the average.

Occasionally, the wrong solution was delivered to a customer. This occurred most often when an existing unit required replacement. Inadequate or wrong applications may be delivered, rendering the unit unsuitable.

Drivers for change could be summarized as follows: increased workload, extended delivery times driving down customer satisfaction and escalation to the IS department resulting in many employees being drawn away from other work. In addition, inaccurate billing was compounding the problems.

FonterraAction
An introduction to Lean principles through a Lean 4×4 workshop was followed by a carefully planned kaizen blitz. A key principle was participation of all those involved so that they may improve and own the new processes. Blitz team members were drawn from the Fonterra IS department and suppliers. The blitz was executed over a three-day workshop; the first day separated by a break for normal work to proceed, then followed by the remaining two workshop days. The aims were to deliver measurable benefits by reducing effort duplication; decreasing MTTC; increasing customer satisfaction; and eliminating escalations.

Many opportunity areas were identified by the brown paper and sticky note method. A consensus view emerged that the two focus areas should be initial order integrity and accuracy, and supply chain speed. The team then divided into two groups to apply focused improvement and root cause analysis techniques to these areas. Approximately 69 actions were formulated, prioritized and allocated to participants.

The online method for ordering and capturing correct information was restructured and the implementation (request and ordering) process was redesigned and mapped to the online tool. This removed manual data transfer to a template that drove the process. Roles and responsibilities were clarified — especially at the handover interfaces. Confusion and “incomplete” handovers were reduced dramatically.

Stock management and reporting were revised and enhanced. Central to this initiative was a move to multiple distribution centers — stockholdings were not lifted but dispersed to centers closer to the common request points. Vital KPIs formed the basis of a weekly management system and the team was measured against these. Analysis of low performance leveraged learning about the system and how it might be improved.

Results
A balanced view of the IS department performance is obtained when the two performance indicators, backlog and call age, are reviewed. Following the kaizen actions, backlog call volumes and age dropped to an acceptable level of around 97% — less than five days. Customer satisfaction has increased by around 13% and is now averaging 4.02 on a 5-point scale. This KPI continues to trend upwards. The query volume after billing has dropped substantially from about 22 to three a month.

This has shown the team the possibilities and a drive to reduce MTTC further has been born. Continuous improvement is taking hold!

MTTC has now dropped to roughly six working days. This has shown the team the possibilities and a drive to reduce MTTC further has been born. Continuous improvement is taking hold!

The positive approach to this opportunity has increased supplier coordination and cooperation. Fonterra IS suppliers are now following the results keenly and seeking further improvements.

Company Background
A leader in dairy science and innovation, Fonterra Cooperative Group is the world’s largest dairy product exporter. Headquartered in New Zealand, it owns a significant brand portfolio in Asia Pacific and partners with many of the world’s leading food companies. With 16,000 employees, the company supplies milk to 140 countries and has offices in more than 40 countries worldwide.

 

Disclaimer
This resource has been prepared for general guidance on matters of interest only, and does not constitute professional advice. You should not act upon the information contained herein without obtaining specific professional advice. Competitive Capabilities International (CCi) does not accept or assume any liability, responsibility or duty of care for any consequences of you or anyone else acting, or refraining to act, in reliance on the information contained in this resource or for any decision based on it.

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